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Full text of "My Country And My People"

l62          MY    COUNTRY   AND    MY    PEOPLE

and   girl   students;   the first  admittance  of girl   students
to the Peking National University in the autumn of  1919,
followed by co-education in  almost  all colleges;  the con-
tinued interest taken in national politics by boy and girl
students, leading to the National Revolution of 1926-7, which
was largely the work of the students, under the combined
leadership and encouragement of the Kuomintang and the
Communist Party, and in which Chinese girls figured promi-
nently as party workers and nurses and even as soldiers; the
continued position of girl Kuomintang members in the party
headquarters after the founding of the government of Nanking;
the sudden prominence of girl civil service servants in all
official bureaux of the government after 1927; the promul-
gation by  the Nanking  Government  of the  law  entitling
daughters  and  sons  to  equal  inheritance;   the  progressive
disappearance of concubinage; the prevalence of girls' schools;
the great popularity of athletics for girls after 1930, and in
particular swimming for girls in 1934; the vogue for nude
pictures^ to be seen every day in newspapers and magazines;
the coming of Margaret Sanger to China in 1922, and the
general spread of birth-control and sex education; the intro-
duction of contraceptive appliances (which alone must precipi-
tate a revolution in ethics); the publication of weekly "women's
supplements" in most big papeis, devoted to the discussion of
women's problems; the publication of Sex Histories (rather
degenerating)   by   Chang   Chingsheng,   a   French-returned
student; the influence of Greta Garbo, Norma Shearer, Mae
West, and Chinese movie stars, and the popularity of movie
magazines, of which there are several; the great spread of
dancing cabarets which came over China about 1928, and in
which the Chinese girls gave everybody a surprise by their
ready adaptability; the permanent wave, English high-heeled
shoes, Parisian perfumes and American silk stockings, the
new high-slit flowing gowns, the brassiere (in place of the
former chest-binding jacket), and the one-piece female bathing
suit.

From bound feet to one-piece bathing suit is indeed a far
cry, and these changes, superficial as they seem, are neverthe-
less profound. For life is made up of such superficialities, and